Mercy


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2 hours ago, askandanswer said:

Which is more merciful: to grant mercy without conditions, or to grant mercy subject to conditions?

My thoughts follow the lines of can there be mercy without conditions; however, I would change conditions to laws. Can there be mercy without laws? Mercy is extended when justice is demanded (at least in part). Justice is the condition for mercy to be offered, and mercy is the condition for justice to take an account.

This follows the line of 2 Nephi 2: 12-13. If all were perfect like Christ mercy would not need to be extended. A "condition" or "law" must be known for mercy or justice to be extended. Otherwise, how does one know if they offered mercy?

Is it merciful to pay someone's hospital bill, if they were in no position of need? If I'm a millionaire, and I have a doctor bill of $1000 and someone offers to pay my doctor bill? Is that merciful or charitable? To some degree, there are times where it would be charitable but not merciful.

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16 hours ago, askandanswer said:

Which is more merciful: to grant mercy without conditions, or to grant mercy subject to conditions?

They are the same, since mercy itself is conditioned on the Lord's atonement. Things like the resurrection are without conditions, and things like forgiveness, are conditional.

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17 hours ago, askandanswer said:

Which is more merciful: to grant mercy without conditions, or to grant mercy subject to conditions?

Depends on the conditions, I suppose.

But purely unconditional mercy would empower the recipient to offend—to rebel, to exploit, to wound, to hurt—again and again and again.

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If we are talking about granting mercy as purely a means for avoiding the demands of justice then mercy without conditions is the most merciful. We see this enacted on behalf of those who live without the law, such as little children.

But if we are talking about mercy as a tool for progression then conditions are necessary otherwise there is no progress and the mercy has not fulfilled it's purpose.

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16 hours ago, laronius said:

If we are talking about granting mercy as purely a means for avoiding the demands of justice then mercy without conditions is the most merciful. We see this enacted on behalf of those who live without the law, such as little children.

But if we are talking about mercy as a tool for progression then conditions are necessary otherwise there is no progress and the mercy has not fulfilled its purpose.

A worthwhile distinction.

The world (and many in the Kingdom) seem to believe that mercy is the opposite, or at least the antithesis, of justice. Not so. The scriptures certainly contrast the two, but the underlying theme is that mercy cannot rob justice. There is no true mercy without justice, and I believe that justice includes true mercy as one of its constituent elements.

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We know that everyone who comes to earth will be resurrected.  Some may feel that that is an unconditional arrangement.

That is incorrect.

We fought in the pre-mortal existence for this opportunity.  And becaused we fought and prevailed with Jehovah, we conditionally recievied the opportunity to come to Earth, be born, tested, die, and resurrected.  

Where we go after the resurrection is conditional upon our performance of said test.

Edited by mikbone
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