Intesting Observation - Scouts Selling Candybars


lilered
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Our ward scout troops have been selling candy bars to raise funds for scout camp. At the close of the daily event, I observed that a few of the scouts had placed some of the candy bars aside and upon questioning, they were theirs, even though they had not purchased them.

Upon further questioning I learned that during the selling process, some customers had simply donated the cost of the candy bar, but didn't want the candy bar. The scouts turned the donated money in, but retained the candy bar in these type of situations. Further they indicated they had been instructed to do so from their parents, reasoning that these candy bars were free and therefore could be eaten by the scouts.

I instead insisted that the scouts turn these candbars in for re-selling by the scouts to further aid in the fund raising. That to do otherwise would be unethicial and the intent of the giver was to donate the purchase to the scout project not to the scout individually. Only when the pre-paid candybar was sold, would the project receive a free donation as intended by the giver, otherwise it was no different than selling a candybar the normal way.

A couple of adults disagreed, indicating that they should not be resold but given to the scouts. Your thoughts?

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They should be resold. I sometimes give money to fundraisers without "purchasing" any of the stuff they're selling to raise funds, and it's so they'll have that much extra $$ in addition to what they make from selling the products. It's not so that the kid selling it can have a free candy bar/cookie/whatever it is they're selling. They are not honoring the spirit of the donation by eating those candy bars.

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Some of the scout's parents aren't very bright are they?

Of course they should re-sell the candy bars. You are out to make a profit afterall, and there is no reason why the scouts should be eating that much candy anyway (I know how many people offer to donate instead of get a candy bar, the number is pretty high.)

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I've gotta side with the they should be selling the candy bars crowd. The money was a donation, unless the person said, "I'll buy 5, but just keep them for yourself" or something similar no candy bars were purchased. If I donated X amount of money to such an endeavor and watched the scout(s) mow down on X amount of candy as they walked away I'd be annoyed. The whole point (well part of it anyway) of donating instead of buying them is so they walk away with 100% profit not X Money - Y Cost of Candy.

I wonder if said parents would think it cool if they donated to an organization that was selling cruises at $1000 with $250 of it going to a charity. So they give $1000 dollars to a random volunteer as a donation to the charity who then turns around and buys the cruise for themselves (or a friend), so instead of $1000 going to the charity as I intended only $250 was and the remainder was being used for someone's personal pleasure instead. Sure we are talking candy instead of cruises but the principle is the same.

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I don't think it's worth judging someone else for. It would be better to sell the candy bar to get double (plus) the money, but I wouldn't have bad feelings for the Scouts or their parents for doing otherwise....besides, you don't know that the people who donated basically let the Scouts believe that they could have the candy. I bet they wouldn't mind at all. Boys/candy, ya know? I think the purchasers/donators probably wouldn't care so much; but I wasn't there.

The great thing about our ward is the spirit of unity, love, forgiveness, and acceptance. That's so much more important than holding grudges or judging others when maybe, perhaps, we don't know the whole story.

Set your standards high and realize each one of us is probably 'off' is some areas. Let's not pick each other apart, but edify one another. It could make the difference of a boy going on a mission, or feeling unworthy, or picked apart, or whatever to come to church.

Set the example and remember we're all on this journey together and our job, unless we're called to be the 'judge' is to love each other and love our Heavenly Father.

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Not sure on this one. Maybe it's like if you give junior 5 dollars to get a Big Mac menu when he's with friends, but that day MC had a half off sale, then shoudl junior give back the difference? I would side with the notion he can keep it since the object ws that he get dinner with his friends that evening.

Whatever the case here I would not loose sleep over it. The scouts in question did all the legwork and they turned the money in that covered the candy. So what?

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Not sure on this one. Maybe it's like if you give junior 5 dollars to get a Big Mac menu when he's with friends, but that day MC had a half off sale, then shoudl junior give back the difference? I would side with the notion he can keep it since the object ws that he get dinner with his friends that evening.

Whatever the case here I would not loose sleep over it. The scouts in question did all the legwork and they turned the money in that covered the candy. So what?

The "so what" is that those donations were in essense stolen by the Scouts when they ate the candy bars. That money wasn't given them to buy candy bars, it was given them specifically to go towards Scouting. And last I checked, free candybars aren't a vital part of the Scouting program. ;) I would be very upset if I gave money to an organization that I wanted to help fund, and found out that my money went to buy candy bars instead.

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I'd ask those within my stewardship to resell the candy bars. If the scouts were outside of my stewardship, I'd keep my mouth closed.

(Hard to do for someone with my screen name, but it's the right thing to do)

LM

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The people making the donation were not intending to buy a candy bar for the Scouts. Their intent was to make sure the FULL AMOUNT of their donation was enjoyed by the Scouting troop, without the expense of a candy bar getting in the way. If their intent were otherwise, they probably would have kept the candy bar and given it to their grandkids.

They should resell, not eat, the candy bars. If they want a candy bar that badly, they can buy it like everyone else.

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i'm with the reselling crowd... another issue could be is each boy fund raising individually or is it being combined as a group effort in one big fund? if being put into one big fund then the boys that are eating up the donations are in essence stealing from the other boys. it's a troop effort and the scout leaders need to meet and decide what the "rules" will be and make sure the boys and their parents understand them.

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what about the other end?

A company makes $50 worth of candy which sell for $100

Scouts need more so they come back and buy more everyone wins,

If they "sell" $100 worth of candy bars, without giving away the merchandise then resale them again for another $100 how is that fair to the original company making them (assuming, there is a set retail price).

One selling magazines could make a trip to kinkos and turn one magazine bought from the distributor into hundred making more money for their cause but it would be unethical. How would this be different? Your short changing the supplier by selling the product twice.

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what about the other end?

A company makes $50 worth of candy which sell for $100

Scouts need more so they come back and buy more everyone wins,

If they "sell" $100 worth of candy bars, without giving away the merchandise then resale them again for another $100 how is that fair to the original company making them (assuming, there is a set retail price).

One selling magazines could make a trip to kinkos and turn one magazine bought from the distributor into hundred making more money for their cause but it would be unethical. How would this be different? Your short changing the supplier by selling the product twice.

But they're not selling them twice. The donation is totally seperate from the candy sales. Someone sees Scouts trying to raise money, and so makes a donation directly to their organization. The candy bars made the person aware that the Scouts were in need of money, but the candy bar manufacturer isn't out any money because the money donated wasn't directed to them, it was directed to the Scout organization as if the candy bars weren't even there.

And besides, I think most candy manufaturers wouldn't care if this happened, because they're "profiting" already from the good juju they get for being associated with Scout fundraisers. "Helping the community" and all that.

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what about the other end?

A company makes $50 worth of candy which sell for $100

Scouts need more so they come back and buy more everyone wins,

If they "sell" $100 worth of candy bars, without giving away the merchandise then resale them again for another $100 how is that fair to the original company making them (assuming, there is a set retail price).

One selling magazines could make a trip to kinkos and turn one magazine bought from the distributor into hundred making more money for their cause but it would be unethical. How would this be different? Your short changing the supplier by selling the product twice.

Not a valid argument. candy bars are sold several times before it makes it from the manufacturer to the end user. manufacturer makes money on first sale, then is out of the game.

if this was a valid point, there would not be used cars or thrift stores.

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But they're not selling them twice. The donation is totally seperate from the candy sales. Someone sees Scouts trying to raise money, and so makes a donation directly to their organization. The candy bars made the person aware that the Scouts were in need of money, but the candy bar manufacturer isn't out any money because the money donated wasn't directed to them, it was directed to the Scout organization as if the candy bars weren't even there.

And besides, I think most candy manufaturers wouldn't care if this happened, because they're "profiting" already from the good juju they get for being associated with Scout fundraisers. "Helping the community" and all that.

I see what your saying but the OP sounds like a sale. I would say it depends and intent of the buyer.

If they say, Here is $50 for Boy scout program and the boys say, sweet, lets count it a sale and eat a box of candy, then they are in the wrong.

It the buyers says, Here is $50 for a box of candy bars but i don't like them so you keep them, and the parents are saying, sweet, lets sell that box again. They are essentially short changing the distributor.

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Not a valid argument. candy bars are sold several times before it makes it from the manufacturer to the end user. manufacturer makes money on first sale, then is out of the game.

if this was a valid point, there would not be used cars or thrift stores.

If the costumer, buying the candy bars were going of and selling them to their friends you would have an analogy. Manufactures make money on repeat business. Many times they set prices ,to some extent, to ensure their product sells good enough to get this repeat business by having the point of sale(I.E. The dealership) order more product.

Here the "Store" is trying to sell the merchandise twice.It isn't the consumer reselling the property.

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I would think that resale would be the way to go, however, in the spirit of giving, maybe giving them to a local shelter for the children? you know set it up for those who do not really want the candy bars but are willing to make a donation. Advise them that if they do not want the candy that the candy will be donated to a local womens center. Some of those women in shelters have they're children with them and I am sure the kids would love some candy.

Edited by myway
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Our ward scout troops have been selling candy bars to raise funds for scout camp. At the close of the daily event, I observed that a few of the scouts had placed some of the candy bars aside and upon questioning, they were theirs, even though they had not purchased them.

Upon further questioning I learned that during the selling process, some customers had simply donated the cost of the candy bar, but didn't want the candy bar. The scouts turned the donated money in, but retained the candy bar in these type of situations. Further they indicated they had been instructed to do so from their parents, reasoning that these candy bars were free and therefore could be eaten by the scouts.

I instead insisted that the scouts turn these candbars in for re-selling by the scouts to further aid in the fund raising. That to do otherwise would be unethicial and the intent of the giver was to donate the purchase to the scout project not to the scout individually. Only when the pre-paid candybar was sold, would the project receive a free donation as intended by the giver, otherwise it was no different than selling a candybar the normal way.

A couple of adults disagreed, indicating that they should not be resold but given to the scouts. Your thoughts?

I have to agree with your judgment. I would approach the Scout Master and make it a suggestion.

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You could also make the argument that allowing the boys to take the candy bars violates Church policy. Fundraisers are permitted to raise funds for purchasing equipment, gear, and food for the unit. Money obtained through fundraising may not be used to provide individuals with anything.

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The scouts would not be reselling the bars ... they didn't sell them in the first place ... there was a donation given ... a sale implies that merchandize changed hands. So they need to sell the bars.

I remember many many moons (40 yrs) ago selling candy for my brother and his troop to go to camp and the national jamboree ... I hate those turtle candies to this day!

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