Questions about LDS rules


DamianZachary
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've seen someone mention a quote of "you live your religion, I'll live mine", and as a non-LDS member I was wondering how that pertained to living as a Mormon. I understand the basis of the Word of Wisdom and abstaining from media thats overly violent/sexual/overall negative, but for someone like me it's often difficult to do things just because they're obligations. I fully understand doing them out of love for God and doing the right thing, but if I were to follow them just because I'm supposed to I think I'd get very frustrated and almost depressed over limiting myself with something my heart isn't fully into submitting myself to (not to God, but rather rules that seem somewhat extraneous, for lack of a better term). So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?vidmate mobdro word counter

 
Edited by DamianZachary
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fellow non-LDS member here, but I think I can answer this question. First, for LDS the Word of Wisdom came from a prophet. So, it is a commandment of God for members. It's not just a rule, it's the equivalent of being "straight from the Bible," for non-LDS Christians. Then again, I suspect that most church members who become engaged in a congregation's spiritual life find certain practices or prohibitions that they are not personally all-in on. For example, in my church the common standard is not to consume alcohol. Our ministers are expected to observe this. Members are strongly encouraged to do likewise. However, might there be a few members who feel that a single drink to celebrate a holiday--perhaps as an ethnic family tradition--is acceptable? I suspect so. Will they depart from the church in a huff if the pastor preaches against alcohol from the pulpit? I hope not.

So, there may be matters that you will come to over time. There are others that are pretty straight forward, either in scripture, in revelation, or in church standards. If one does not agree with this strong standards they probably should not join the church or movement. As an example, my denomination is Pentecostal. During an ordination preparation class one of the leaders said that if candidates did not agree with speaking in tongues he could recommend other denominations that are solid, Bible-believing, and are comprised of folks we expect to meet in heaven. However, such candidates should not pursue ordination with our denomination, since we strongly believe speaking in tongues is valid and normative in our churches.

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

I've seen someone mention a quote of "you live your religion, I'll live mine", and as a non-LDS member I was wondering how that pertained to living as a Mormon. I understand the basis of the Word of Wisdom and abstaining from media thats overly violent/sexual/overall negative, but for someone like me it's often difficult to do things just because they're obligations. I fully understand doing them out of love for God and doing the right thing, but if I were to follow them just because I'm supposed to I think I'd get very frustrated and almost depressed over limiting myself with something my heart isn't fully into submitting myself to (not to God, but rather rules that seem somewhat extraneous, for lack of a better term). So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

 

Joseph Smith taught, "“The fundamental principles of our religion are the testimony of the Apostles and Prophets, concerning Jesus Christ, that He died, was buried and rose again the third day, and ascended into heaven; and all other things which pertain to our religion are only appendages to it”. If someone feels negatively about an "appendage," I would recommend remembering this fundamental principle and the love that is hopefully generated thereby.

Some of the "appendages" are nothing to sneeze at, either. The quote continues, "But in connection with these, we believe in the gift of the Holy Ghost, the power of faith, the enjoyment of the spiritual gifts according to the will of God, the restoration of the house of Israel, and the final triumph of truth.” These appendages also generate love. Love infuses the feelings of obligation to the Lord, and our attitude in observing any "appendage" follows.

Moroni 7: 8,9: "For behold, if a man being evil giveth a gift, he doeth it grudgingly; wherefore it is counted unto him the same as if he had retained the gift; wherefore he is counted evil before God. And likewise also is it counted evil unto a man, if he shall pray and not with areal intent of heart; yea, and it profiteth him nothing, for God receiveth none such."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on what you mean by Obligation and Love.  We are to do what God commands us to do.

None of us are perfect and in many case it is a natural progression..  God commanded me to do this, but I do not understand it, but I am going to do it because I Love and trust God.  This could be considered Obligatory action.  It is an acceptable first step. By taking that first step we grow and learn and come to love it.

This even works if we are not sure if something is of God but we are willing to try and see.

If however we do not think it is of God then we have no Faith in the matter... and without Faith it is impossible to please God.  Faith is an action word.  Therefore the better question is not should you do something out of Obligation or Love... that is a distraction.  The Real Question is... the Important Question is... "Are you acting out of Faith or not?"  The answer to that question answers everything else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

but for someone like me it's often difficult to do things just because they're obligations. I fully understand doing them out of love for God and doing the right thing, but if I were to follow them just because I'm supposed to I think I'd get very frustrated and almost depressed over limiting myself with something my heart isn't fully into submitting myself to (not to God, but rather rules that seem somewhat extraneous, for lack of a better term).

Humility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

I've seen someone mention a quote of "you live your religion, I'll live mine", and as a non-LDS member I was wondering how that pertained to living as a Mormon. I understand the basis of the Word of Wisdom and abstaining from media thats overly violent/sexual/overall negative, but for someone like me it's often difficult to do things just because they're obligations. I fully understand doing them out of love for God and doing the right thing, but if I were to follow them just because I'm supposed to I think I'd get very frustrated and almost depressed over limiting myself with something my heart isn't fully into submitting myself to (not to God, but rather rules that seem somewhat extraneous, for lack of a better term). So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

 

For me, it comes down to obligation and a logic chain is the best way for me to come to personal answers.  I know God loves me, individually.  I know this is Christ's restored Church.  Then the other decisions I make, whether or not I have a testimony of them, stem from what I know.  For example, since I know this is Christ's Church, if the Church says I shouldn't drink coffee then it doesn't matter if I have a personal testimony on that.  I just don't drink coffee.  It isn't "limiting".  It isn't something to get depressed over.  It's relatively minor.  You aren't going to die or be miserable if you don't have coffee in your life.  The same applies to harmful media.  You may want those things, but you don't need them.  

You aren't submitting yourself to "rules".  You ARE submitting yourself to God.  It's important to follow ALL of our obligations to God, but that's fairly impossible in our mortal bodies.  That's why we have repentance and time to grow and become better.  

My suggestion to you is to try each thing you are struggling with and see how you feel about it after.   Commit to not doing one thing for 30 days.  Go into it with an open mind.  Pray on it.  See if the Spirt speaks to you about your actions.  That worked for me.  Most things I received confirmation of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

You actively pursue getting your heart in line with His and having His will be done.  Not passively "I'll do it when I feel like", but actively getting on your knees and learning to accept & love Him and His will.  

Learning to accept His will can be... hard- there's no getting around that.  My personal commandment struggle is .... I suffer from Prodigal's-Son's-Good-Brother syndrome.   But that human weakness doesn't mean we shouldn't still strive to follow Him.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love? 

As humans we have a tendency to over complicate simple principles of progression. As a father if there are rules in my home do I expect my children to follow them even if they feel negative about them? (i.e. curfew, limit on mobile devices, etc...) If my children feel negative about them should they keep the rule? The answer to both of these questions is, "Yes, of course."

When we play any sport there are rules in the game so that order can exist. Basketball is my favorite sport. When people choose not to follow rules it is called "jungle ball." Even if I feel negatively about a rule is it important that I keep it? Yes, of course, or I have to be willing to accept the consequence. The reason why I choose not to travel is because I understand the game. I understand the rules. I also understand the consequence of breaking the rule. So, should people who play basketball keep the rules of the sport even if they feel negatively about the rule. The answer again is simple, "Yes, of course."

It is better to keep rules because we love the giver of the rule/commandment. This type of questioning causes me to think about the Law of Moses. If you/I were born during that time we can ask ourselves the same question. Would it be better to keep the rule (although I feel negative about it), or would it be better for me to disobey until I can be obedient through loving the rule, or the giver of the rule? Obedience is the first law of heaven.

The answer is really simple. Be obedient until you can love the rule and the giver of the rule as that is the best option. Pray that your heart will increase in love for God, while you are being obedient. If your prayer and desire is sincere then what was initially burdensome will become joy. If your prayer is without real intent, without true desire, then you (general) will remain with negative thoughts towards being obedient because you (general) simply don't desire/wish to keep it.

Edited by Anddenex
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

Any kind of obedience is better than disobedience. And you have zero probability of "coming around to love" God's commandments if you do not strictly follow them, so the very choice is based on a false premise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, DamianZachary said:

I've seen someone mention a quote of "you live your religion, I'll live mine", and as a non-LDS member I was wondering how that pertained to living as a Mormon. I understand the basis of the Word of Wisdom and abstaining from media thats overly violent/sexual/overall negative, but for someone like me it's often difficult to do things just because they're obligations. I fully understand doing them out of love for God and doing the right thing, but if I were to follow them just because I'm supposed to I think I'd get very frustrated and almost depressed over limiting myself with something my heart isn't fully into submitting myself to (not to God, but rather rules that seem somewhat extraneous, for lack of a better term). So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

 

I will take this discussion a slightly different direction.  I grew up in a family of overachievers.  At one time my father was rated as the #2 best skier in the nation for his age category.  My grandmother was the Utah mother of the year.  My two older brothers were valedictorians of their graduating class.  As much as I thought I was achieving as a youth - the reality is that, especially compared to others in my family - I was and still am quite ordinary.

Ordinary people can achieve extraordinary things.  For an ordinary person to achieve extraordinary things the one single common denominator is discipline.   I am not a person that believes in blindly following anything.  I am convinced that mob or popular behavior is the greatest downfall of intelligent humans.  Discipline is not easy to learn - the difficulty of discipline is perhaps what set those apart that learn discipline.

I believe the Word of Wisdom is primarily a tool of discipline.  It is a easy first step of faith into discipline.  Anyone can begin discipline for spiritual things with the Word of Wisdom.  It is not a grand achievement.  But one cannot be discipline to achieve great things without first learning to achieving simple things of discipline.

I recommend the Word of Wisdom for anyone determined to become disciplined.  I also recommend that someone discipline themselves by making their bed when they arise.   I recommend simple acts of discipline to give a person the mental power to take control of their life.  I call it picking the low hanging fruit.   Starting with simple disciplinary things leads to greater and greater things.  The prophet Isaiah said that we learn and achieve line upon line upon line and precept upon precept upon precept.

 

The Traveler

Edited by Traveler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2020 at 12:54 AM, DamianZachary said:

 So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?vidmate mobdro word counter

 

Your struggle is not unique to you. I think we all feel that tug-a-war within us between what the Book of Mormon calls our spiritual side and the natural side of us. We can know something is right but that doesn't mean we want to do it. Our hearts and minds often don't align and that leads to the frustration you mention. But in answer to your question, yes the Lord wants us to keep his commandments even if we don't feel like it. But that doesn't mean we are doomed to a life of frustration and feeling torn inside. The scriptures teach us about how through the atonement of Jesus Christ we can have a change of heart so that our desires do align with what we know to be right and true. I think this is the true peace that Christ offers us. Peace from that internal conflict. So exercise some faith and strive to keep the commandments even though part of you doesn't want to but also go to the Lord and seek this change of heart. We define the Lord's grace as an enabling power. As you turn to the Lord he will grant you this power to be able to keep his commandments and to find great joy in the process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2020 at 2:54 AM, DamianZachary said:

So my question is, from an LDS perspective, would it still be important to follow those obligations if I feel so negatively about them or would it be better to allow myself to come around to them out of love?

In addition to the Word of Wisdom, Gospel Principles says "Our prophets have told us that we should not shop, hunt, fish,
attend sports events, or participate in similar activities on that day
."

I'm not LDS myself, but if I were, I'd say it is important to follow the guidance given by prophets if it is supported by the
scriptures.  But personally, I would go on a Sunday fishing trip to share the gospel with a non-believer if that opportunity
arose.

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Ask them if they would like to call their parents and just chat for a few minutes. Most missionaries will say no, but the look on their face as you ask will be indicative of how open they are to other topics. It's a surprise question that they will not expect.. VidMate sdmoviespoint cinevez

If a missionary confidently and boldy says "No", then they will often be unwilling to discuss other topics openly. If they nervously hesitate with their answer, then you may have found a missionary that will listen to you.

Edited by alphayash
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, alphayash said:

Ask them if they would like to call their parents and just chat for a few minutes. Most missionaries will say no, but the look on their face as you ask will be indicative of how open they are to other topics. It's a surprise question that they will not expect.

If a missionary confidently and boldy says "No", then they will often be unwilling to discuss other topics openly. If they nervously hesitate with their answer, then you may have found a missionary that will listen to you.

Something to remember is that these missionaries are, quite literally, just kids. Sometimes their reaction may seem “weird” or “different” because they aren’t very experienced in life. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2022 at 7:16 PM, alphayash said:

Ask them if they would like to call their parents and just chat for a few minutes. Most missionaries will say no, but the look on their face as you ask will be indicative of how open they are to other topics. It's a surprise question that they will not expect.. VidMate sdmoviespoint cinevez

If a missionary confidently and boldy says "No", then they will often be unwilling to discuss other topics openly. If they nervously hesitate with their answer, then you may have found a missionary that will listen to you.


What is your intention with the missionaries? Are you trying to engage in a specific discussion? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share