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  1. My wife @Dollfacekilla and I have been married for 12 years. And this coming Saturday... ...at the Philadelphia Temple... ...we're getting Sealed. ..finally. Just, ya know, thought some of you might like to know
    28 points
  2. So, with some of the topics I have felt a bit of negativity recently (probably on my own part perhaps) and so I thought I'd create a positive thread. In this thread we compliment those we know of in the forum. I'm going to try to give everyone compliments (and if Somehow I miss you, PLEASE, tell me in the thread. It is not due to maliciousness on my part, but I'm a older and sometimes my mind is not as sharp as many others around her. Forgive me for my bad memory and jog it with a post so I can include you). So, I'll start... @JaneDoe I appreciate your thoughtful replies @NeuroTypical I enjoy your snark at times, and though I may not understand it, your little Pony enthusiasm @CV75 I enjoy your willingness to discuss things with people who have questions and your recent posts in the Resurrection thread. @zil I appreciate that you are active on the forums and, though I do not understand it fully, that you are so enthusiastic about fountain pens @BJ64 I think it is great that you pick up on small details and want to help those that are striving to do better @Traveler I appreciate you injecting a more scientific approach at times and explaining things from a more technical mindset @MormonGator I like that someone from a rival team is here (LoL), but I also enjoy that you can relax the forum and spring in some humor when we all get too serious @FetherI think that you do wonderfully at striving to do good, and this is an extremely commendable thing @Iggy I think your staunch support of standards and your desire to help others up is something that is wonderful @MrShorty You seem to be able to navigate the middle ground at times and try to create peace. The Lord said, blessed is the peacemakers. @Grunt I appreciate how you bring up the gospel so plainly and point out how these we should know. It brings us back to how we should be, rather than trying to dodge around commandments. @Just_A_Guy I think you look great in a suit ( hah). @Just_A_Guy I do think it was good you wore a suit, but there is more to compliment you on, just making a joke because I know you can take it. That's what I like about you, you can take all the abuse and still be nice. @Carborendum I think you and I are more alike than we may think at times, and I like how you stick to your guns and your morals. @Anddenex You bring in thoughtful injections into conversations that note that you really think about the subject and consider what is said or not said @Scott I appreciate how you like to go back to sources. You like to check to see where something is sourced and give a source for your comments @Blackmarch You are blunt at times, but we all need the blunt truth to bring us back to reality. @Laniston You have a smaller post history so it is harder to define what I enjoy, but from what I've seen, I think I appreciate your willingness to share personal experiences with the rest of us. @unixknightI enjoy how frank you are in admitting your own difficulties which helps us to understand our own and help prop others up in there striving to be good. @estradling75 I not sure I understand the carebear, but I do appreciate your willingness to share your opinion, even when others may be hostile to it. It takes courage to do so at times. @SilentOne You are exceptional and you speak through listening and only say something when it is important. We all could learn more from your approach. @Vort I love that you stand for something (the gospel). Gordon B. Hinckley instructed us so and it is good to see someone doing that. @Emmanuel Goldstein Not a ton of posts to know you well yet, but you seem to convey a lot with very little. @mrmarklin I like that you are able to converse with those who need advice and share with them in order to help them @pwrfrk I think it is good that you bring us to recognize how blessed we are and strive to help others with your advice and words of peace @theplains Not a long time member, but it seems that you enjoy talking about the gospel with others and I think that is a good thing to do. @wenglund I appreciate how you are normally trying to discuss hard subjects without condemnation or judgement, but rather understanding and hope. @Jersey Boy I think that you are willing to share your feelings in the open which is a hard thing some of us have doing. @Rob Osborn You point out the plain and precious things of the gospel at times. Even if we don't agree with all your opinions, I think it is terrific that you point these things out @NeedleinA You are a wonder to read in your posts. You try to help others on the forums and have some interesting perspectives @Crypto I see you post infrequently but people genuinely like you and your posts here @warnerfranklin I haven't seen you around much recently on the forums, but I appreciate how you share your views and opinions and how thoughtful you can be @Lost Boy I like how you express sympathy for those in need and empathy for others. I appreciate how you can make us think about how others are and how we should be. @Midwest LDS Thank you for how you interact with others and taking the time to listen @Backroads I also enjoy how you show empathy for others and how you, despite your troubles, try to listen. I hope that you continue to enjoy your new job also @askandanswer I find your answers refreshing at times and your injections in conversations interesting @mordorbund Tis an interesting name you have. LotR connection? I think you express your humility at times and I appreciate that willingness @mirkwood Another reference that seems it could be a Lord of the Rings thing? Anyways, I think you try to make things lighter on the forums and make others laugh. @anatess2 I like how you tell it how it is. You come right out and tell us what you think and I feel that is a good thing. @person0 You have things to share with us that enlightens our minds, though you also tend to joke around as well at times @classylady Your name bespeaks for itself. We would all do better if we had as much class as you @Maureen You help us to recognize that we are mistaken in many of our assumptions and point out the good in others @bytebear I find your comments fun to read and at time enlightening @seashmore I look forward to reading your posts and enjoy what you have to say. I enjoy how you share your experiences and your thoughts on things @DennisTate You are another that I cannot say I have read a ton of your comments, but from what I see you are thoughtful and reflect on what you write. @LiterateParakeet Your posts are refreshing on these forums as they try to see the best in people and view the best possible things about others @MaryJehanne Your willingness to share about the Catholic Church is appreciated @Lindy sharing experiences from your life is good in showing us examples and ways to be. @Sunday21 Your enthusiasm is a beacon for us all. Your love for the temple is also something I admire greatly @SpiritDragon You are a wonderful person that seems to be Canadian. @Jeremy A I'm not sure how many have participated in your trivia but you keep on trying and going. You are like the energizer bunny. Perserverance is a positive quality. I'm certain I've missed many, I've tried to include as many as possible and yet I've probably still failed. If so, be aware it is NOT because I don't think you are wonderful, but simply because there are so many names and so many people and remembering them all is sometimes very difficult. I probably forgot some of the closest and dearest ones that are on these forums. I apologize, but if I did miss you, just tell me in the next day or two and I'll hopefully have that to jog my memory. Don't let me be the only one, if you have people you want to compliment on something they did on the forum, go ahead and post it! We should recognize people for doing good!
    24 points
  3. Advise boards always seem to leave us hanging. So...I thought I would give you all an update. In April of 2017 I was excommunicated, and in May of 2018 my discaplinary counsil was re-conveined. I am excited to let you know that I have been authorized to be rebaptised. We haven't yet selected a date, but it should be soon. My marriage is stronger than ever. I feel closer to my children and my relationship with my Father in Heaven and Savior is stronger than ever as well. I am very grateful to my Savior, for his mercy and power. I'm grateful for the struggle, it helps us determine where we want to be and affirms our dedication in obtaining those promised blessings. To any that are currently struggling...Press on, it's worth it!!
    17 points
  4. Phoenix310

    I'm not a Mormon

    I'm not a Mormon. At best, I'm a struggling non-denominational Christian. I'm also a person who has done something many non-Mormons won't do. I have always heard so many negative things about Mormons and the LDS. Horrible things that made want to stay clear of Mormons. All my life, childhood, adulthood, in and out church, from everyone including fellow Christian's. Horrible things said about Mormons. One day, servings at my now old church, I had a fellow Christian make a negative remark about Mormons. One remark too many for me to accept. So I asked him, what proof do you have to back up your remark? He struggled, but failed to give any proof. His remarks was based on ignorance and social impressed impression/social acceptence. That was not okay. Facts from learning he failed to have. So this got me thinking that day about what the truth was about Mormons and the howdo I find out. Well, it was days after that some missionaries came to my door. I saw opportunity and it just knocked on my front door. It was this moment where I knew a journey for me was starting. I talked to the missionaries and invested time to learn about Mormons and the LDS. Without any judgement, I gave my desires to learn the truth. Want to know what I learned? ... First, there are endless lies constantly being told about Mormons and the LDS Church. Out of ignorance and other motivated reasons, people tell lies about Mormons. Oh my goodness, the lies I always heard. Misinformed andmisundertood because it is easier to tell a lie than to take out the time to learn the truth. Mormons are good hearted people has a strong sense of family. A sense of family that is stronger than any I've seen from any other faith. A sense of family that can not be compared or equal to any other faith. I was super amaze. I've learned alot about Mormons and the LDS Church. I have more learning to do and I'm not a Mormon, but find myself defending the Mormon faith with an open mind against the lies and insults I hear constantly. No, I'm not a Mormon but I will defend thier faith when I hear lies and insults others say. Why? Cause I have learned the truth about Mormons and the LDS Church and I will not accept anything but the truth. Mormons are good people and always welcome in my life and home. I have more to learn, but I am getting with missionaries. We'll see where my journey goes from hear. Don't need to be a Mormon to like them.
    17 points
  5. I've been on this forum for a while and I've even gotten into trouble a few times. As of late, I haven't been posting very much because, you know, LIFE. But I thought I'd pass along that after 18+ years, I've had my blessings restored.
    15 points
  6. The problem is that our culture is drifting toward the idea that the only way to show compassion and love toward someone is to support every single thing they do. "Love the sinner, hate the sin" is an idea that people are forgetting in alarming numbers. What makes it worse in the case of LGBT issues is that instead of someone's sexuality being an aspect of their personality, it's treated as the core of their being... so if you disapprove of homosexual behavior, our culture interprets that as hating the person himself/herself. "It's who I AM!!!!" It's a completely illogical notion, but one that has taken in a LOT of people.
    15 points
  7. Wow. It has been over 4 years. I had nearly forgotten about this post, but I'm sure some random internet lurkers are bound to happen upon this thread and want advice about their own situation or just want to know how things turned out. First of all, thank you all for the advice. To all the lurkers, there is some awesome advice here. I married her! Never regretted it! We're loving life. Now, a few things that I've learned: 1. She was never the problem. It was always me (basically, I was an idiot). 2. The idea of virginity is just that, an idea. 3. What matters most is that you're best friends. Best friends are loyal to each other no matter what happened in the past. 4. The past isn't real. The present is everything. The future is a dream. My advice, is that if you're in this type of situation, get over yourself. Assuming your significant other is completely loyal to you, if you still find yourself "haunted" by their past then the most important thing you need to ask yourself is, "Can I be the spouse my SO needs?" If the answer is no, then stop jeopardizing your SO's happiness by constantly dragging your thoughts through the nonexistant past. Get out of the relationship for their sake. If you can honestly answer yes, then go for it. You've got an entire lifetime to make amazing memories together. I was taught growing up that it was better to die than to lose your virtue. I disagree with that. I was also taught that those who had lost their virtue were like "licked ice cream" or "chewed gum". That way of thinking is wrong, and it's very harmful. Let go of that type of thinking. It benefits no one. Elizabeth Smart talked about what it feels like to be a "chewed piece of gum" and it sounds terrible: http://fox13now.com/2013/05/06/elizabeth-smart-i-felt-like-a-chewed-up-piece-of-gum/ Don't put your SO through that. If you're best friends, nothing else matters. Best of luck to your SO (and you) if you're in the situation I was in. In conclusion, this image sums it all up:
    15 points
  8. My little boy, my 37 yr old pumpkin, is engaged! I think they will get married at the end of next term. They've been dating 2 years, she's a doctoral student as well - in education statistics, for crying out loud. Petite (former gymnast), a blond Swede to match my son's 20% Finnish background (we got tested). She actually came with me to a church activity. I'd say the two of them are what I understand to be 'dry Mormons.' They like a lot about the Mormon lifestyle, but aren't ready to make the commitment, but culturally, at least, there's a meeting of the minds on modesty, family night, preparedness, homeschooling, the role of the father in the family, etc., which is good. Actually, other than homeschooling, this is pretty much how we lived before I converted. I'm glad he wants to repeat it in his own family, whether he's in the Church or not. She's 28 and ready to have babies (her words), so, perhaps I'll be a nana before they put me in the assisted living facility.
    15 points
  9. The Folk Prophet

    Goodbye

    For those of you who asked for the update, we're having a little boy.
    14 points
  10. Mission Accomplished.
    14 points
  11. Timothy, first off—if I could give you a bear hug, I would. You’re in a unique form of hell that not many parents ever have to go through. Second—I am a state attorney representing DCFS in my jurisdiction. I don’t know the law in your jurisdiction and won’t presume to give you legal advice about whatever mandatory reporting may or may not apply. (Also: yay for anonymous internet forums, amirite? Keeps things much less complicated for both of us if I don’t know where you live.) I will say, though, having sat in on numerous team meetings with perpetrators, survivors, therapists, psychologists, and judges; that neither you nor your wife are in ANY WAY prepared to help either your son or your daughter get through this on your own. You guys are 100% out of your depth, no matter what experiences your wife remembers having gone through. Also, statistically speaking, sex offenders almost never stop at one victim. I hate to be so blunt, but the chances are well over 80% that your son either has already molested others in addition to your daughter—or he’s going to. (That doesn’t make him an irredeemably bad kid or mean that you’ve failed as a parent; it’s just the nature of his psychosis.). The state needs to be involved here. You should also be aware that if the state eventually does find out about this, they’re going to be asking some hard questions about why you didn’t make a report sooner; and that may jeopardize your custody over *all* of your children. Third—do NOT talk to your daughter about this. She needs to be interviewed by a trained investigator/therapist; and unskilled interviewers can do more harm than good from both a psychological and forensic standpoint. Once the report has been made, law enforcement will probably want to take her to a Children’s Justice Center for her interview. It will be a comfortable, home-like environment with toys and soft chairs; and she will probably be allowed to have a support person with her during the interview so long as the support person doesn’t interfere with the interview. Fourth—your son will probably have to leave the home almost immediately once the report has been made. They won’t put him in detention if they can avoid it; so start thinking of extended family members he can stay with who don’t have small children in the home. Odds are that at some point your son will wind up in a group home-type environment for a lengthy period of time, once the full set of psychological evaluations has been completed. He’s got a long road ahead. It’s going to be natural to want to recoil in horror from him because of what he’s done to your little girl; but you need to know that if you do that, you’ll lose him, emotionally. There’s a way for him to come back and be a fully productive, contributing, safe member of society—but without the support of you and your wife, that way gets a lot harder. Similarly, your little girl needs to know that the changes your family is about to go through aren’t her fault; and you need to avoid the trap of having her needs being overshadowed by her brother’s needs. The children’s justice center/law enforcement/DCFS can get you in touch with some folks who can coach you about how to strike the right balance. There will probably be a “delinquency” juvenile court case involving your son that addresses the criminal aspects of what has happened. (Those records are usually confidential, so your son probably won’t have a “criminal record” once he turns 21). DCFS might also ask the juvenile court to open a “protective services” case involving the rest of your family, simply so the court can supervise and make sure that the family follows through on any therapeutic treatment that may be indicated for any of the children. Things are going to start happening really fast for the next couple of weeks, and it will be hard and scary and confusing. But you will get through it. As for your bishop—if this interview just happened this afternoon, then maybe he’s still trying to figure out how to break the news. Who knows? But don’t waste time making him out to be either a crutch or a bad guy—he may well be as flat-footed and bewildered by this as you are; and right now you’ve got bigger fish to fry. The simple fact is that you’re the dad: now that you know the situation, the buck stops with you. Best of luck—
    14 points
  12. In another thread or two, it's been stated that we don't know exactly what went on with former prophets and revelation. We don't know and that it's ok that we don't--sometimes we are asked to go on faith. I'm involved in the Indianapolis Temple open house/tours that is currently going on. As part of the tour, we are letting people know that no photographs are allowed inside the temple, but photos are available on our website. One woman asked why no photographs if there are already pictures available? The sister missionaries turned to me with panic in their eyes and I simply responded, "I don't know. I don't know the answer to that. All I can say is that we are asking that you not take photographs while inside." I think that we are in an information age that can be overwhelming with knowledge. We have so many facts and other information available to us at the touch of a finger. With the advent of the internet, information can be gained instantaneously. But, sometimes we need to be courageous and say, "I don't know." Sometimes that needs to be followed up with, "but I'll find out." And sometimes we need to be satisfied that we don't know something and that it doesn't mean we are wrong, dumb, or secretive. This reminds me that there are some things about the Gospel that I don't understand at all or fully. But, isn't that what faith is for? I have a testimony of Jesus as my Savior, that the church is His church, the Book of Mormon is scripture and Joseph Smith was who he said he was. Everything else just falls under that. So what if my understanding is less than a 2 year old? I plan on taking some awesome classes in the next life and there are gonna be some great teachers.... "Sealings: what do they really do and why are they so necessary? -- taught by Elijah and Malachi." I don't know everything and I'm ok....I need to make that my mantra.
    14 points
  13. Your house, your rules. If he wants to play the "I'm an adult now" card, then he can show you that by being an adult: start by getting his own place and paying his own bills. And that's completely ok. Warning I'm VERY going to be blunt here-- Your son is committing a GRAVE sin. He is taking the scared powers God gave him -- the powers to create life itself and to bond a married couple -- and bastardizing it. Throwing that sacred gift in the mud and treating it as if it was a nothing more than a child's play thing. It is a HUGE disgrace to God, His gift, your son, and the girl involved. And you, the parents, are endorsing it by allowing you to commit such acts under your roof with you paying the bills, etc. In my house, we respect God and His gifts. You don't need to believe as I do (my husband is actually an Evangelical and I have atheists over all the time), but we're going to respect God. I don't care what age you are: we're going to respect God in this house. You want your own rules? Get your own house.
    13 points
  14. He is in Seattle for a stadium-sized meeting, and a staff member invited me to join his family. I figured that, as a chaplain and Mormonhub moderator, I should accept. So, tonight I will join 10s of thousands. Has anyone been to this kind of event? Any thoughts to offer? I'll certainly give my impressions within the next day or two.
    13 points
  15. Updating this: found new job. Loving it. It's technically a longer commute, but goes opposite rush hour traffic as I zip up the freeway or the old highway. All the other teachers in my ward hate me for it. Hours are significantly better, classes are smaller, the That Kid has nothing on what I have dealt with (though is the superintendent's grandson/legal ward so that's interesting), and I feel the school has an actual plan It's nice feeling happy at work.
    13 points
  16. @JayKi, From the time I returned from my mission to Italy, I had an Italian pen pal. She actually was sort of "in love" with me, but after I made it clear that we weren't going to go in that direction, we had a very nice, years-long letter-writing relationship. (This was in the years before email.) Though I didn't want romance with her, I really cared about this young woman. When I married my wife, she objected to my Italian female pen pal. Like you, I didn't understand this attitude. Like you, I thought I should be able to be friends with whomever I wanted, and it was really not any of her business. I mentioned this to my mother one day in passing, and she quickly set me straight. I decided that if my wife and mother agreed about that thing, it was probably myself that was not seeing things right. So I wished my pen pal well and stopped writing her. That's the kind of thing we do to safeguard marriage. The marital state is a sacred thing, and we should sanctify it. Honestly, friend, if this woman's husband doesn't want you seeing her, You Should Not Be Seeing Her. Her marriage to her husband is vastly more important than your friendship with her. Look, you're a smart guy. Be smart enough to realize that when two dozen people tell you the same thing -- two dozen people who, by the way, probably wouldn't find anything else to agree on in a year of conversation -- that means that you are probably the one who's wrong. Don't be prideful, friend. Be humble. Tell your friend you are happy to keep hanging out with her, as long as her husband is there, too. Maybe you can bring your girlfriend/fiancée with you and make it a double date. Just keep it on the up-and-up.
    13 points
  17. Fair enough. I will share my personal story of growth. Wife and kids embarked into things 4-H, and we got chickens and turkeys and stuff. When it was fall, I got the mixed blessing of being sent to the meat processing folks, turn some of our chickens into "chicken". Wife already knew all this stuff, but daughters and I learned. We all cried as we loaded them up. It was a somber and quiet ride back. Wife taught daughters where their food comes from, and we're all more mature now. That wasn't the story - here's the story: The next spring, they sent me again, with more chickens. These chickens weren't culled in the fall. We kept them through the winter. I was loading them up at 5am, shivering in the cold, making sure they would have protection from the wind as I drove to the plant. Because you treat life with respect, and making critters suffer, even if they're going to be dead in an hour, isn't what you do. As I loaded them up, several things dawned on me. First, they'd been in our barn the entire winter, which had been a heck of a lot colder than this morning. That was fine - chickens are just fine pretty much no matter how cold it gets - as long as they're dry and out of the wind. But it wasn't like they were out frolicking in the sun eating bugs. When you're livestock, winter is something you endure and live through - not something you particularly enjoy. It's a law of reality. It also dawned on me that these chickens had been perfectly ready to go to the processors last fall, and they had endured the winter because I had NOT taken them to be processed. That was the personal growth I'm talking about - these critters were born to live and then die and be food. It was their nature. Their God-given purpose. It dawned on me that these tiny-brained feathery critters understood this better than I did. I anthromorphized a discussion with them when I got back. Wife: How did they do? Me: Just fine. They weren't happy with me though. Wife: What do you mean? Me: They kept calling me fat boy. They said "It's about dang time. Wake us up early to take us on a drive that should have happened last year. We were cold last winter, fat boy." I learned about stewardship over the earth and the creatures that crawl upon it that day. I learned about the law of the harvest. I got no better way to explain it than this. If you still don't get it, maybe it takes actually raising something and killing it to teach this lesson. The firefighters did right by the piglets, and the farmers did right by the firefighters. To have let those piglets die would have been unethical. To expect the saved piglets to be anything besides pigs, would have been to ignore the law of the harvest.
    13 points
  18. Today was lawn-mowing day. Husband wound up having to stay very late with the client. I was playing with my girls in the yard, musing about a recent desire to learn how to use a lawn mower after watching some 9-year-old girl with the sturdiness of a stalk of celery mowing the lawn. So... I pulled up a PDF of our lawn mower's user manual... and I mowed the lawn. I feel so empowered.
    13 points
  19. Dear Little Linda's mom, Thanks for your note. I love having Little Linda as a student and I think she's a great kid. I understand your feelings and respect that you want to feed your daughter healthy foods. However, I'm her teacher, not her mother, and it would be both inappropriate and against school policy for me to bring her snacks. But feel free to send Little Linda to school with her snacks; she will be allowed to eat them at lunchtime and at other appropriate times during the day. If you want the school to provide food for Little Linda, the school lunch program is the way the school discharges that duty. My understanding is that the school lunches are nutritious and pleasant. If you have concerns about them, please feel free to discuss that with the administration. The principal can be reached at 987-654-3210, and by email at [email protected] Thanks, Little Linda's teacher
    13 points
  20. Vort

    Help... LoC

    In all honesty, get a different boyfriend. This one cares nothing for you personally, your goals, or what you are trying to achieve. If things are as you say, he is not worth your time. Talk to him once more, just long enough to say "Goodbye, good luck, and never contact me again", then begin your new life as a disciple of Christ who does not have a creepy boyfriend. Sorry if this sounds unChristlike. I don't think it is. Sometimes we have to do the hard thing, like tell a "boyfriend" that he is no longer any such thing.
    13 points
  21. Some of you may recall the announcement a while back that my wife was expecting. For those who like baby news or those who have been wondering my lovely Mrs. SpiritDragon invited our little spirit dragon-whelp into the world Friday night. Our newest addition is a little girl. 7 lbs, 12 oz.
    13 points
  22. My son got married this weekend. Of course, the folks at church who are his age have been married 10-15 years, but better late than never, I suppose. We had rain, but it stopped for the outdoor wedding and every time we had to do something, so that worked out (big shout out, HF!). Now for the grandkids!
    13 points
  23. The subject of one's excommunication should never be a part of a Relief Society lesson or a Sunday School lesson.
    13 points
  24. 13 points
  25. It's Thanksgiving Day, so I figured I'd announce that, yes I am thankful for the nearly 23 years the LORD has allowed me to serve as a prison chaplain. Alas, mandatory retirement is fast approaching, and I prayerfully put in to do so at the end of this year. Next steps likely include my continuing as a volunteer pastor and transitioning to my first love--teaching. It's not yet certain how that will look, but I am convinced that what lies ahead will be even better than that which is passing. Oh … and no, I'm not retiring from here. Mercy has its limits.
    12 points
  26. It will be next year that my wife and I will have been married for twenty years. Hopefully our marriage sealing will be sealed by the Holy Spirit in the next life if we continue faithful to life eternal. We also now have just reached one full gross year of income saved for in our emergency fund and retirement combined. Please share any milestones or goals reached if you wish.
    12 points
  27. She was arrested for trespassing. The park was closed, she failed to leave. Cities and counties have the authority to close their parks.
    12 points
  28. Old first, new second. My goodness!
    12 points
  29. dprh

    Membership in the Church

    https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/general-conference/2002/04/the-gospel-in-our-lives?lang=eng I just finished listening to this talk. It is often true that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone. Since I've been excommunicated, I've begun to realize all the things I took for granted as a member. I wait with anticipation until I can take the sacrament, pay tithing, serve in a calling, even say prayers in church. If you are able, please participate and enjoy these blessings.
    12 points
  30. Fixing someone's suicidal thoughts with premarital sex? Yeah, no, not the best idea. "I tried everything else but nothing worked" - her problems are not yours to fix. They are hers to fix. If I were you, I'd postpone the wedding, read a bunch of books on suicide, attend some premarital counseling sessions. I would not marry someone with unresolved suicidal issues - it's not fair to either of you.
    12 points
  31. zil

    Wish Me Luck

    Tonight I started the application process for enrolling at BYU-Provo (continuing education, evening classes). Now I need to go get interviewed by my bishop and a member of the stake presidency. My application to Brandon Sanderson's workshop class is ready to go, along with my writing sample (thanks to an excellent reviewer here - you know who you are - thank you). Submissions (for the class) will be accepted starting later this month. Assuming BYU lets me in, and I'm selected as one of the 15 lucky souls who get into the class, I will be well on my way to being a professional writer. (If that doesn't happen, I'll have to hobble on my way without the help.) Feel free to share your own hopes / good fortune in this thread.
    12 points
  32. So, first I will say I made a wise choice going with the staff member and his family. It was pretty easy to blend in, and being part of a family going made it feel much more natural. There were 49K plus in attendance, and a repeated theme, even by a couple of the speakers, was the unique privilege of being able to see and hear God's prophet in person. Other common themes were the privilege of the restored gospel, the powerful witness the Book of Mormon offers (with reference to the Moroni promise, as well as James admonition to ask the Lord for wisdom), and the power and blessing of temples (with their covenants and sealings, etc.). As for styling, the feel was that of the old church--dress up, piano and organ, and order of worship clearly laid out. President Russell was impressive in his energy, his conviction, and the clarity of his message. There was a good blend of classy, yet comfortable. I may not have a testimony of several of the unique doctrines and claims of the church, but it is now much easier for me to understand why so many find strength and comfort in the church, the community, and from its teachings.
    12 points
  33. One reason, is because until the covenant is made, there isn't a covenant in place. Up until that moment, either party is fully able to back out of the deal at any time, with or without reason. And it happens.
    12 points
  34. The big question mark, of course, is what does "doing more" mean? Where does the rubber hit the road? I do like @Sunday21's idea of having a glass partition between the clerk's office and bishop's office. But that said, windows are to ecclesiastical sex abuse what banning AR-15s is to gun violence: They are solutions geared towards a statistically-insignificant subset of the problem. Most abusive ecclesiastical leaders aren't doing the nasty with female congregants right there in their offices. Bishop's case is a statistical outlier, but even his alleged assaults didn't happen in his regular office; he had apparently set up another room for his use. And as the administrator of what is essentially a small-sized college complete with dorm rooms, if the administrator wants a place for his rendezvous . . . he's going to have the power to set that up. He just is. So, what changes are we really looking at? So far, those leading the outrage seem to want changes in the power/relational dynamics at play; and to this end I've seen advocating for five major changes: 1) Every allegation is to be believed--not only in dealing with the victim on a therapeutic basis; but in dealing with the perpetrator on a punitive basis; 2) Alleged perpetrators are to receive formal LDS discipline forthwith, with the victims being made aware of the results; 3) ecclesiastical leaders should receive no special deference within their congregations; 4) ecclesiastical leaders should not be interviewing congregants on a one-on-one basis; and 5) ecclesiastical leaders shouldn't be talking about chastity issues with youth under any circumstances. Without going into too long of a rant; suffice it to say that I think 1), 2), 3), and 5) are nonstarters; and I think the ultimate resolution of 4) is that it's going to need to be determined by individual bishops on a case-by-case basis. Also, I agree with @The Folk Prophet . When Ms. Park says that "One of the biggest issues in our community is how the faithful and the non-faithful interact. It has been an issue that has long-since plagued our people"--well, ma'am, it's a faith community. Traditionally when one chooses not to have faith in the community's truth claims, one elects not to remain in the community. The issue is that Mormonism's "faith community" has worked so well, from a socio-cultural standpoint, that it has accrued a lot of sociological bling that the disaffected don't want to give up. So they make a concerted effort to get the overall faith community to abandon its truth claims and replace them with a faith in sociological riches attenuated to left-wing social justice theory; never stopping to wonder whether they may be killing the doctrinal goose that's been laying all those culturally golden eggs. But then those pesky "True Believing Mormons" push back on the grounds that a) they sort of like Mormonism the way it is, and b) they're pretty sure God does too. And the disaffected completely lose their cookies over the resultant impasse. They hate us; they honestly hate us—with a depth incomprehensible to those who haven’t been subjected to it; and with a justification incomprehensible to those who have been subjected to it. What Ms. Park (who, by the way, is one of the head honchos over at the "Feminist [anti-]Mormon Housewives" blog) is really saying is, "I'm not going to let this crisis go to waste. Not only am I going to push for changes that are going to make Mormonism "safer"; but I'm going to push for ways to convert Mormonism from a religion to a social club."
    12 points
  35. The Holy Spirit of Promise has to ratify any sealing that is performed in the temple in order for it to persist in the exalted world, and He won't ratify that which is not in accordance with the desires of the consenting agents and God.
    12 points
  36. Since I have been investigating the LDS church, members (and you lot!) keep telling me that something will happen and I will feel the spirit and things will change. As most of you know I like things to make sense, I like to study things and gain knowledge and understanding of truth that way. I know that is not how most LDS members come to find the truth of the Book of Mormon. Anyway, for all of you who know someone like me, PLEASE get them to read this very simple article currently featured on this website. https://mormonhub.com/blog/faith/defending-the-faith/book-of-mormon-hoax/ I actually cried while reading it. I don't know if I have a complete testimony for the church or all its teachings, but I know one thing. Joseph Smith was a prophet of God and the Book of Mormon is true. Thank you all so much for helping (and putting up with) me. I feel very happy and full of hope. Now I just have to save my husband!
    12 points
  37. zil

    Squashing doubts

    While waiting to see if anyone has a similar experience, I will tell you something which in my experience is 100% true: It does not matter whether your decision was right; make it so that it is right. Don't fall for the modern-world nonsense of "right person". You, as an agent to act, can make it so that your decision is the right one. You can actively do things so that you love your husband deeply now, are committed completely to him now - beyond doubt, and are happy together with him now. This will be easier if he works with you in compatible ways. Tell the doubts to take a flying leap and then get to work making your decision the right one. This is far, far better than any alternative.
    12 points
  38. Hello, my name is LadyGator! Yes, that LadyGator. I decided that it was time to stop letting @MormonGator have all of the fun so I decided to join in.
    12 points
  39. Urstadt

    Sealed today

    My wife, a recent convert to the church, and I were sealed today to each other and to our 4-month old son. She was still a recent convert when we were married in 2013, so after prayerful consideration, we decided on a civil wedding. 22 months later now, the eternal marriage is complete. I love the gospel so much. The beauty and truthfulness of the gospel serves as protection to us in such a polarized world. I am grateful for the guidance and protection the gospel and Priesthood authority provides us, both temporally and eternally. I just wanted to share something positive and testimonial on here. Thank you for the opportunity to share it.
    12 points
  40. A little bit of a story with a happy ending to share-- For me, the most difficult part about being in an interfaith marriage is not the non-member husband, but handling the evangelical mother-in-law that comes with him. When hubby and I started dating, MIL was a huge fan of me… except for my “Mormon problem”. Needless to say religion has been a rocky subject. To learn about Mormonism, MIL signed up for a class on the subject at her church, entitled “Mormonism and the Evil Cults” (or something like that). She got a lot of bad information, and doesn’t really listen to what I say because she honestly thinks I’m brainwashed and hell-bound (roll eyes). Though, to be fair to her, I haven’t been perfect on the issue (like not inviting her far enough in advance to baby girl’s blessing). Anyway, the purpose of this post is to celebrate: last night we chatted and had a great discussion sharing testimonies. I learned a lot more about her and feel that she learned a lot more about me. Not only did she not stone me for sharing me testimony, she liked it! I’m still kind of in “wow” shock…. Just wanted to share good news with you all J.
    12 points
  41. Hi Ruthiesmom - I can understand being thrown for a loop by some of the newer stuff that's out there. That said, I do think there's good scholarly evidence out there that leaves room for belief. Given the way the Church has traditionally told its story, there may be some preconceptions you'll have to leave behind--but be careful not to throw out the baby with the bathwater. What factors led you to have a "testimony"? Have those specific factors really changed? Generally speaking: Fairlds.org is a good apologetics site; so is JeffLindsay.com. Joseph Smith's polygamy is covered in-depth by Brian Hales' website at josephsmithpolygamy.org. FARMS/Maxwell Institute has some good info; so does MormonInterpreter.com. Lots of folks here will also be happy to discuss your concerns, with the caveat that you'll probably see a better response if you open a new thread specifically dealing with each concern as opposed to simply creating a "laundry list thread" and continually shifting from one concern to the next (makes it easier to stay on topic). :) Pres. Uchtdorf's advice to "doubt your doubts" also has some merit. Be sure to ask critical questions of those who are asking critical questions. For example: 1. Why is it so much worse if Joseph Smith translated most of the Book of Mormon through one magic rock (the Chase seer stone) as opposed to two magic rocks (Urim and Thummim)? 2. Why would Smith bother to develop an Egyptian Grammar/Alphabet at all, if he knew it would be useless in translating any other Egyptian texts that might fall into his hands and might actually be used by his associates to constrain or undermine any future translations he might produce? 3. Why did some of Joseph Smith's most bitter detractors nevertheless maintain that Fanny Alger was, in fact, sealed to Joseph Smith? 4. If William McLellin's report was correct that everyone--or even a critical mass of attendees--was smashed at the Kirtland (not Nauvoo) Temple dedication, then why did McLellin--by his own account--try to conceal the visibly drunk Samuel Smith from the view of the rest of the congregation? 5. Mormonism has a reasonably coherent theological rationale for why requests for some miracles--even when made via priesthood blessings--can go unanswered. Can atheism produce any secular rationale for the miracles that do happen, other than the same "frenzied mind" "anyone-who-disagrees-with-me-is-mentally-ill" psychobabble that Korihor was spouting two millennia ago? Anyhow . . . by all means, study it out; but remember that nobody discusses Mormonism without bias. Those who claim to, are lying. Be willing to admit what you don't know, and beware of anyone--inside or outside of Mormonism--who claims to have easy, pat answers for anything. And, don't buy into the idea that you Must Do Something Right Now. You've lived the lifestyle. It's not a bad one. Your kids aren't being secretly introduced to cocaine, or groomed to participate in someone's harem. Nothing's going to happen with your kids inside of Mormonism for the next few months--or even years, if that's what it takes--that won't be substantially reversible if you ultimately decide your conscience requires you to leave. Take your time, do your research, fast, study, pray, and when you feel ready--make a decision and stick with it.
    12 points
  42. I have not said anything before because it is your choice, (and I can respect that) I had no real practical experience to offer, and all the generic things I might have said had already been said. But with this post I feel I have something to add. When you asked about having your name removed I figured/guess/assumed that you wanted to cut off all contact with the church more or less permanently. Removing your name is the way to do that. But this post sound like you are more interesting in maybe taking a break and then trying to start over? Removing your name for a reset or starting over is like setting off a bomb when you want to remodel your house. Sure it can gets you a clean slate, but it is much more extreme then is really necessary. If you are looking to come back (maybe) at a future date then there are less extreme methods to do that then to have your name removed.
    12 points
  43. LOL...my SP described our speaking together in each ward as the "speaking tour." On a more serious note. He said that his keys and authority in our stake led him to have us speak together in all the wards of the stake on this topic. He said it could not wait until Stake Conference in February. We spoke in the first three wards today. His talk followed mine, which was to support what I said and also add in some spiritual aspects. My talk is below. @zil I'll be in your ward next week. Temporal Matters In the October 1998 General Conference, President Gordon B. Hinkley said, “I wish to speak to you about temporal matters.” I was called by President ********** to be a Self Reliance Specialist for the stake. I was given the specific assignment in that calling to help the stake become temporally prepared in the areas of food storage and emergency preparedness. The state of temporal preparedness in the ************** Stake weighs heavily on my mind. President ********** has asked me to speak to the entire Stake about temporal matters. I do not wish to be an alarmist, but some of the statements from the prophets and apostles are foreboding in nature as they sound the clarion call of warning. President Hinckley read a few verses from the 41st chapter of Genesis during the October 1998 General Conference. I want to share those verses with you again. Pharaoh, the ruler of Egypt, dreamed dreams which greatly troubled him. The wise men of his court could not give an interpretation. Joseph was then brought before him: “Pharaoh said unto Joseph, In my dream, behold, I stood upon the bank of the river: “And, behold, there came up out of the river seven kine, fat fleshed and well favoured; and they fed in a meadow: “And, behold, seven other kine came up after them, poor and very ill favoured and lean fleshed. “And the lean and the ill favoured kine did eat up the first seven fat kine: “And I saw in my dream … seven ears came up in one stalk, full and good: “And, behold, seven ears, withered, thin, and blasted with the east wind, sprung up after them: “And the thin ears devoured the seven good ears: “And Joseph said unto Pharaoh, … God hath shewed Pharaoh what he is about to do. “The seven good kine are seven years; and the seven good ears are seven years: the dream is one. “What God is about to do he sheweth unto Pharaoh. “Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt: “And there shall arise after them seven years of famine; “… And God will shortly bring it to pass” President Hinckley said that he was not predicting a famine, but he told us it was time to get our houses in order. He then emphatically stated, “there is a portent of stormy weather ahead to which we had better give heed.” The definition of portent is: 1. an indication or omen of something about to happen, especially something momentous. And 2. threatening or disquieting significance. The definition of heed is: 1. pay attention to; (or) take notice of. And 2. careful attention. Our prophets and the apostles carefully select the words they use when they speak. We should always pay close attention to the phrasing they use in their talks. As members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints we sustain the members of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as prophets, seers, and revelators. Their teachings reflect the will of the Lord. They give us instruction, warnings, and counsel from the Lord for our day. The Lord reveals His will for the Church to His prophet. There are some, both in and out of the church, who question the wisdom of statements made from our leaders. Elder Jeffery R. Holland addressed this issue during General Conference in 2006. He said, “Not often but over the years some sources have suggested that the Brethren are out of touch in their declarations, that they don’t know the issues, that some of their policies and practices are out-of-date, not relevant to our times. I say with all the fervor of my soul that never in my personal or professional life have I ever associated with any group who are so in touch, who know so profoundly the issues facing us, who look so deeply into the old, stay so open to the new, and weigh so carefully, thoughtfully, and prayerfully everything in between.” Twenty three years ago our prophet, the mouthpiece of the Lord, gave us a warning. He told us stormy weather was ahead. He counseled us to get our houses in order. He counseled us to be prepared. He followed that warning up three years later in the October 2001 General Conference saying, “I cannot forget the great lesson of Pharaoh’s dream of the fat and lean kine and of the full and withered stalks of corn.” Brothers and sisters, we have had twenty years since that second statement to get our houses in order. We have been given the opportunity to hear counsel from the Lord’s mouthpiece and become temporally prepared for what is ahead. I strongly urge you to make an honest assessment in your own home as to the state of your temporal preparedness and take appropriate temporal steps as needed. There are various aspects to being self-reliant. These include temporal preparedness, finances, employment, emotional resilience and making sure you are spiritually in tune to receive the guidance of the spirit as you become prepared. Elder David A. Bednar taught us in General Conference last year about the importance of tests. He said, “…periodic tests are absolutely essential to learning. An effective test helps us to compare what we need to know with what we actually know about a specific subject; it also provides a standard against which we can evaluate our learning and development.” In the midst of the Covid 19 shutdown we had an earthquake. Though minor, this earthquake showed many families where they stand regarding the state of their personal preparedness with food storage and other essential items already in their homes. We witnessed a dramatic emptying of shelves at the grocery store. Today I am bringing the message of food storage and emergency preparedness. One only needs to look at the chaos in the grocery stores of last year in the early days of the Covid 19 shutdowns to see the wisdom in having food and other essential items on hand in your homes. We saw shortages of common items, including toilet paper, cleaning supplies, milk, baking goods, bottled water and butter, just to name a few. Today we still see the effects of tyrannical government behavior due to Covid restrictions and their impact on the local and world economy. A local dairy has struggled to get their milk to the grocery store shelves due to a shortage of plastic lids for their milk jugs. We see a decrease in the variety of foods we commonly purchase. Some shelves still remain bare or hold minimal product. Perhaps even more telling is the ninety day closure that just occurred to one of the largest long term food storage companies in the world. They sent out a notice to their customers that they have stopped production until early next year because they are unable to procure the food they use in making their products. President Ezra Taft Benson said, “The revelation to store food may be as essential to our temporal salvation today as boarding the ark was to the people in the days of Noah.” (Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign January 1974) Brothers and sisters, it was not raining when Noah built the ark, but he built it and the rains came. The past two years have proven to be trying times for all of us. One of the ways that can help us strengthen and grow is through the principle of preparation. We have been commanded in the Doctrine and Covenants to “prepare every needful thing… (D&C 88:119) We also are promised that “if ye are prepared ye shall not fear. (D&C 38:30) Some members of our church believe that food storage and emergency preparedness are no longer topics of importance or necessary. Elder Bednar had this to say a year ago during General Conference: “Some Church members opine that emergency plans and supplies, food storage, and 72-hour kits must not be important anymore because the Brethren have not spoken recently and extensively about these and related topics in general conference. But repeated admonitions to prepare have been proclaimed by leaders of the Church for decades. The consistency of prophetic counsel over time creates a powerful concert of clarity and a warning volume far louder than solo performances can ever produce.” We see that some members believe all we need do is work on our spirituality. They believe there is no need for temporal preparation and all we need to do is be spiritually prepared. In Doctrine and Covenants 29 we learn an important principle from the Lord. Verse 34 says: “Wherefore, verily I say unto you that all things unto me are spiritual, and not at any time have I given unto you a law which was temporal,” (D&C 29:34) The parable of the ten virgins teaches us this lesson about both temporal and spiritual preparedness. Elder Bednar reminded us last year during General Conference about this lesson. He taught us that procrastinating preparation leads to devastating consequences. Recall how the five foolish virgins failed to prepare appropriately for the day of the bridegroom’s coming. “They that were foolish took their lamps, and took no oil with them: “But the wise took oil in their vessels with their lamps. … “And at midnight there was a cry made, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him. “Then all those virgins arose, and trimmed their lamps. “And the foolish said unto the wise, Give us of your oil; for our lamps are gone out. “But the wise answered, saying, Not so; lest there be not enough for us and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for yourselves. “And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut. “Afterward came also the other virgins, saying, Lord, Lord, open to us.” “But he answered and said, Verily I say unto you, Ye know me not.” President Spencer W. Kimball had this to say about the parable: “The ten virgins belonged to the kingdom and had every right to the blessings—except that five were not valiant and were not ready when the great day came. They were unprepared through not living all the commandments.” President Kimball said the virgins belong to the kingdom. The kingdom refers to the members of his church. Half the kingdom failed to prepare and suffered a devastating consequence for their failure to be obedient. There are some members who believe when hard times arrive we will all pool our food and everyone will have enough. They somehow believe that a miracle like the fishes and loaves will occur for them, or they think the Law of Consecration will take care of everyone. Let me read to you Doctrine and Covenants, section 130: verses 20-21: 20 There is a law, irrevocably decreed in heaven before the foundations of this world, upon which all blessings are predicated— 21 And when we obtain any blessing from God, it is by obedience to that law upon which it is predicated. If we fail to obey a principle of the gospel, we cannot receive the blessings for another’s faithfulness. Faith without works is dead. If you do not have the faith to follow the consistent counsel from the prophets and apostles to put up some food storage and other essentials for your family, how can you believe you will have faith equal to the fishes and loaves miracle? For those who smugly think that the Law of Consecration will protect them, allow me to point out certain principles associated with the doctrine. Under the Law of Consecration all things are deeded to the church. The agent bishop than returns a stewardship back to you based on your needs and circumstances. That stewardship becomes private property for the steward and his family. It is not communal property. If there is a surplus from that stewardship, it would then go to the bishop’s storehouse to care for the poor and needy. To be clear, under this law, a year supply of food for one family, is not a year supply for everyone else to tap into. If there was any surplus, it would be available through the bishop’s storehouse. Let me share what Elder Boyd K. Packer said about home storage in his book The Holy Temple (pg 227-229): “Consider this comparison. In the welfare program we have been counseled for generations by the leaders of the Church to secure for ourselves a year's supply of food and clothing, and if possible fuel, and to be concerned for our shelter. This is a responsibility laid upon the individual members of the Church, upon each family. The commodities are to be stored at home. They are to be privately purchased, privately stored, and in time of crisis privately used.“ Elder James E. Faust said, “The Church cannot be expected to provide for every one of its millions of members in case of public or personal disaster.” Several years ago the father of one of my friends, who was a regional representative at the time, told us that the storehouses of the church have enough food stored, to feed every family in the church, in the world, a single meal and then all the food was gone. It is not ever suggested that because we have bishop's storehouses there would be no need for individual families to maintain their year's supply. The counsel for the individual to protect himself and his family has never been withdrawn. It has been continually emphasized. President Benson put to rest that idea that the storehouse will care for us all when he said, “Our bishops storehouses are not intended to stock enough commodities to care for all the members of the Church. Storehouses are only established to care for the poor and the needy. For this reason, members of the Church have been instructed to personally store a year's supply of food, clothing, and, where possible, fuel.” (Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson, p.267) I am going to share with you some verses from the Book of Mormon. 1 Nephi 16:18-20 18 And it came to pass that as I, Nephi, went forth to slay food, behold, I did break my bow, which was made of fine steel; and after I did break my bow, behold, my brethren were angry with me because of the loss of my bow, for we did obtain no food. 19 And it came to pass that we did return without food to our families, and being much fatigued, because of their journeying, they did suffer much for the want of food. 20 And it came to pass that Laman and Lemuel and the sons of Ishmael did begin to murmur exceedingly, because of their sufferings and afflictions in the wilderness; and also my father began to murmur against the Lord his God; yea, and they were all exceedingly sorrowful, even that they did murmur against the Lord. Lehi was a prophet of God and he faltered when he was hungry. He was far more spiritual than we are, and if his hunger drove him to murmur against the Lord, then how do we think we will fare when the day of need arrives? The Lord expects us to be prepared both spiritually and temporally. President Kimball said, "We encourage families to have on hand this year's supply; and we say it over and over and over and repeat over and over the scriptures of the Lord where He says, 'Why call ye me, Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?' How empty it is as they put their spirituality, so-called, into action and call him by his important names, but fail to do the things which he says" (Spencer W. Kimball, "Family Preparedness," Ensign, May 1976, 125). President Kimball also said, "There will come a time when there isn’t a store.“ (President Spencer W. Kimball General Conference, April 1974 ) Key home storage principles include the storage of food, the storage of water, and the storage of other necessities based on individual and family needs, all because “the best storehouse” is the home, which becomes the most accessible reserve in times of need. Bishop McMullin in his 2008 General Conference talk said, “brethren, we lay up in store. Wives are instrumental in this work, but they need husbands who lead out in family preparedness. Children need parents who instill in them this righteous tradition. They will then do likewise with their children, and their stores will not fail. A cardinal principle of the gospel is to prepare for the day of scarcity. Work, industry, frugality are part of the royal order of life. Remember these words from Paul: “If any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.” Bishop W. Christopher Waddell pointed out last year during General conference that, “In today’s environment, with a pandemic that has devastated whole economies as well as individual lives, it would be inconsistent with a compassionate Savior to ignore the reality that many are struggling and ask them to begin building a reserve of food and money for the future. However, that does not mean that we should permanently ignore principles of preparation—only that these principles should be applied “in wisdom and order” so that in the future we might say, as did Joseph in Egypt, “There was bread.” For those who are struggling due to financial strain, start with a one week’s supply and build to a month. Then build to three months and continue to that goal of a long term supply of food. So many feel that a long term supply of food is beyond their reach and make no effort. Begin in a small and consistent way. Bishop Waddell went on to teach that, “Being temporally prepared and self-reliant means “believing that through the grace, or enabling power, of Jesus Christ and our own effort, we are able to obtain all the spiritual and temporal necessities of life we require for ourselves and our families.” Additional aspects of a spiritual foundation for temporal preparedness include acting “in wisdom and order,” which implies a gradual buildup of food storage and savings over time, as well as embracing “small and simple” means, which is a demonstration of faith that the Lord will magnify our small but consistent efforts.” As you work towards your goal of having a long term storage of food, do not go to extremes. Going into debt to achieve this goal is contrary to the principles of self-reliance. Exercising your faith in Jesus Christ, through obedience to gospel principles, will guide you in your efforts. As you do your very best, you can be confident that “the barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail.” You will enjoy greater wisdom, security, peace of mind, and personal well-being. The Lord does not expect us to do more than we can do, but He does expect us to do what we can do, when we can do it. As President Nelson has said, “The Lord loves effort.” Closing remarks….. As we embrace spiritual principles and seek inspiration from the Lord, we will be guided to know the Lord’s will for us, individually and as families, and how best to apply the important principles of temporal preparedness. The most important step of all is to begin. President Henry B. Eyring posted to his Facebook page the statement, “The scriptures make the danger of delay clear. It is that we may discover that we have run out of time. (Facebook Post January 8, 2015 President Eyring) Elder L. Tom Perry counseled us to, “Acquire and store a reserve of food and supplies that will sustain life,” and “…we have been taught to prepare for the future and to obtain a year's supply of necessities. I would guess that the years of plenty have almost universally caused us to set aside this counsel. I believe the time to disregard this counsel is over.” (If Ye Are Prepared Ye Shall Not Fear," Ensign, Nov. 1995, 36). Joseph Smith said we would, …”do well to discern the signs of the times.” Brothers and sisters, we live in the Last Days. The signs of the times in our day are events that were prophesied to take place in the latter days before the Second Coming of Christ. Signs are the recognizable events or occurrences which identify present events and which portend future events. Those signs are all around us if we look. Elder Dallin H. Oaks said the signs of the times “ [are] increasing in frequency and intensity.“ (Elder Dallin H. Oaks April 2004 General Conference"Preparation for the Second Coming") And President Eyring warned us, "The giant earthquake, and the tsunamis it sent crashing into the coasts around the Indian Ocean, is just the beginning and a part of what is to come..." (President Henry B. Eyring BYU–Idaho Devotional, Jan. 25, 2005 "Raise the Bar") President Benson spoke of these signs as well, stating, “I speak with a feeling of great urgency…Too often we bask in our comfortable complacency and rationalize that the ravages of war, economic disaster, famine, and earthquake cannot happen here. Those who believe this are either not acquainted with the revelations of the Lord, or they do not believe them. Those who smugly think these calamities will not happen, that they somehow will be set aside because of the righteousness of the Saints, are deceived and will rue the day they harbored such a delusion. The Lord has warned and forewarned us against a day of great tribulation and given us counsel, through His servants, on how we can be prepared for these difficult times. Have we heeded His counsel?” (Ezra Taft Benson, Ensign, November 1980) We have been commanded to watch and be ready. Bishop McMullin said, “The feeling of peace and the desire to be faithful to the commandment given by the Lord through the modern prophet helps us feel the Holy Spirit, … to not be afraid, and to see that the signs of the time for the Second Coming of the Lord is a blessing and not something to fear. We rejoice in it. … It gives us the motivation to be faithful and endure to the end and to be saved and obtain eternal life.” (Bishop McMullin, Lay Up In Store) Temporal preparedness is part of our preparation for the last days and the return of our Lord Jesus Christ. Elder Bednar taught this principle when he said: “Taking action is the exercise of faith. … True faith is focused in and on the Lord Jesus Christ and always leads to action.” Brothers and sisters, I add my voice of testimony to the words of our prophets and apostles. I testify that obedience to the principles of food and home storage and self-reliance will bring peace of mind in these perilous times. As we seek to become temporally prepared, we can face the trials of life with increased confidence, peace in our hearts, and like Joseph in Egypt, we will be able to say, “There was bread.” In the name of Jesus Christ, amen.
    11 points
  44. mirkwood

    Nike

    I woke up at 0500 today. I put on one of my black non-endorsement t-shirts I wear every day to work. Over that shirt I strapped on my body armor. No endorsements on it either, or anywhere on my uniform. Just your basic dark blue shirt and pants. Oh I do wear things on my shirt, a badge, some ribbons because someone said I did a good job on a call. I wear my name on my shirt too, but no endorsements. I work a primarily white community, but we do have a heavy Hispanic population and some African refugees. I will talk to many of them today. Some of them will call me names. Some will hate me because I wear a uniform. Because I stand for something. Twenty one years ago I took an oath and signed a blank check to the citizens of Salt Lake County. I made that blank check payable up to and including my life. I hope I don’t have to sacrifice everything today, but I will if asked, because I actually stand for something. ~mirk
    11 points
  45. This topic can be sensitive, and I was tempted to place in the Christian beliefs forum. However, my sense is that the spiritual struggle that politics sometimes generates affects us all. Here's the story--made vague on purpose. A man seminary-educated (Protestant graduate theology school) in the 1970s becomes ordained in his mainline denomination and pastors a single church for nearly 30 years. As he sees his denomination embrace gay marriage, ordain practicing homosexuals, and now fully embrace transgenderism, he comes to the soul-wrenching decision to leave his denomination--including guiding his church out. He was able to join another denomination, under the same larger umbrella, and today says his former denomination cannot be merely labed liberal--it has become radical, in his view. I read his article and, taken at face value, I agree. In the 1990s, when I was at my much-more-Bible-based denominational seminary I remember classmates saying with a bit of bravado that they were thankful that we would never affirm anti-biblical sexuality. Today we remain nowhere near violating those standards. However, there are some frightfully strong rumblings among our youngest clergy. A few pastors have left us, because they do want to embrace today's cultural norms. In the greater Evangelical world there are several thinkers suggesting a huge divide is coming over support/opposition to POTUS. Apparently many younger believers find it hypocritical and even evil that their elders would turn a blind eye to the shortcomings in order to gain temporary protection and support. "Do we trust God or Caesar?" they ask. If the church is led by prophets, and those prophets remain true, then a few may leave the church, whether to the left or the right. If boundary-protectors force the church to the right, outside of God's directing, then a good number will leave for the left. Those who do so will be younger. On the other hand, if the cultural-accommodaters get ahead of God's directions, many elders may leave in dismay. After some initial growth by excited young people, such a movement would go the way of many in-tune denominations--gradual implosion. I'm an outsider. However, if my counsel is worth anything, I'd urge members to pray for their leaders--especially those they believe to be anointed by God to be prophets. In the mean time, I am praying for my leaders to keep our denomination faithful to God and his Word.
    11 points
  46. Just_A_Guy

    Prayer Dillema

    I’m thinking of that line in Huck Finn about how you can’t pray a lie. If, as a matter of courtesy, you use your brother’s preferred pronoun in his presence, that’s certainly none of my business (and even if it were, I’d have no beef with that). But, as a matter of truth/objective reality, there’s still a Y chromosome. Your brother’s a male, the emperor has no clothes, there are four lights, and all that jazz; and I’m not sure we do ourselves any favors when we buy into a delusion before God.
    11 points
  47. He lies because he is ashamed, or doesn't want to lose standing in your sight. It doesn't help that you take any setback as some kind of slight against you. He needs to feel fully loved and fully accepted and fully respected by his spouse even when he slips up in this area and his trying to hide his struggle from you makes me think he doesn't feel that. Addictions often have a physical component, like an illness. Would you react this this if he was having a relapse of cancer? I know that is not a perfect analogy, but it has value. He is fighting a war against his own body and he needs you as an ally. It is his relationship with you and his relationship with God that will get him to make progress day by day till it is overcome. You may wind up facing the same kind of situation with your children later on and if you come down on them or make them feel judged you will drive them away.
    11 points
  48. Translating this into English, we get: "We've broken it short of intercourse, but don't want to face that fact." IMO, go see your bishop(s) who can help you understand the seriousness of it. Perhaps right after you go get a civil marriage to ensure you don't sin further. I have also found that a detailed study (which is not the same as "reading scriptures", and which includes pondering, note taking, and more pondering) of something you think you understand will give you greater understanding.
    11 points
  49. NeedleinA

    DO NOT try this!

    So... this totally back fired in my face and I would highly suggest not duplicating it either. This happened a couple of days ago. In my "wisdom" I decided to do a prank on my family since I had access to a fog/smoke machine for an upcoming Youth Dance. I sneaked the machine downstairs and waited until my wife and kids were all upstairs cooking and getting ready for dinner. This smoke machine is definitely a high output device. I turned on the machine close to the basement stairs leading up to the kitchen area. Smoke quickly filled the down stairs and to my surprise, thinking it was a "fog" machine, the smoke detectors all started going off. The alarms triggered the start of the panic upstairs. "What is going on?" "Are you burning the food?" "Where is your father?!?' As they called/screamed for me I remained silent down stairs. Shortly afterwards the smoke made it's way upstairs... finally they saw the smoke and that it was coming from downstairs. This set off a higher level of panic and some choice words from my loving wife (who never swears, ever!). As they called down for me from the upstairs, I still remained silent. So with all the alarms blaring, panicked kids, swearing wife I decided to emerge while laughing. Well... the reaction of my wife realizing it was a joke/prank almost left me one step away from being divorced I have seen her mad before, but she was MAAADDDD x1,000,000. Oh boy! So lessons learned: 1. Don't prank involving your death. My wife thought I had died or was dying downstairs. 2. Realize that your family will basically panic in a house fire situation unless you have practiced this. 3. Realize that you are going to burn downstairs because no one came to rescue Dad...he is disposable So again... don't try this if you want a happy marriage. Don't do this because you might come to the shocking realization that your family loves you, but not enough to risk their lives to go help you downstairs.
    11 points